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i understand that it’s okay to like the works of problematic people, or even to like problematic works as long as you address them and work with them, but jezebel hasn’t even mentioned this new shit with wayne coyne at all.  not just the author of this article but like at all, in any article.

they addressed the issue with the erykah badu/flaming lips music video, which is important, especially, i think, considering amanda palmer’s role as erykah’s replacement.  that was two years ago.  also, the article introducing this miley cyrus/flaming lips video has no disclaimers like, “so i know wayne coyne is racist and sexist and sups problematic and miley cyrus is too, but check out this video; you may be wary but it’s worth watching.”  it would be so easy.  although i think the quality of the song is impossible to determine because of all the screaming in the two bootleg videos posted on the page, i won’t even fight the writer’s use of “kinda perfect” as description.  you can have that.  i will let you have that.

can i also add that it was not a good move on jezebel’s part to embed the original problematic/nonconsensual video with erykah badu’s sister (who is supposed to be mistaken for a naked erykah) at the end of that (the most recent erykah badu) article.  like, instead, you can link to it and say, “here’s the original if you’re curious—btw massive heap of trigger warnings,” not, “and here, for your gross-out pleasure, is the original.”  this last sentence suggests that we’re supposed to see this massive violation of trust resulting in a rift between two artists as a titillating source of “gross-out pleasure.”  that’s an extremely dismissive way to describe the connotations of the original video.

but i suspect jezebel may just not know what even to do with the wayne coyne/kliph scurlock/christina fallin ordeal because they don’t know how to link it to feminism, maybe?  but there are lots of things you can do, the first step being addressing it (it being wayne coyne’s racism) at all, because a feminism that is not intersectional is not something that i want to read.

otherwise, you can talk about how scurlock is trying to be a good ally but decided to fold over and cover his butt in saying coyne is “not a racist” or you can talk about scurlock throwing heavily gendered, highly problematic insults at fallin (this is problematic because scurlock is a cis man and thus lacks the position to reclaim/use the word “cunt”), or sarah barthel’s participation in fallin’s and coyne’s racism and what that means for the burgeoning indie music scene.  you could talk about fallin’s upbringing as a white girl in oklahoma, daughter of a republican governor mom, and how she feels entitled to trying on generic “native american” culture once in a while, presumably to be edgy, because she knew what she was doing when she posted that photo with that caption.  you should probably talk about all of these things.

idk i could write about this for a long time.  i’m just angry that it’s not getting more coverage in feminist circles, i guess.  i’m angry that people who like the flaming lips don’t know about this, or that they don’t feel the need to take the time to examine coyne’s behavior and address it and ask that he take accountability.

sorry kliph scurlock i know you’re trying to cover your own ass but i still think wayne coyne is racist and i am not ready to give that up

christina fallin definitely is racist

and by extension, in his defense of her, especially that instagram photo, wayne coyne is racist too

i would be inclined to call their actions racist and leave it at that (that is the “good” way to call someone out as it makes them “more likely to admit it and take accountability for their actions”) but by now they’ve been called out enough times that i think their subsequent actions and non-apologies reflect on who they are as people.  they may not be overtly racist in the same way in which, say, donald sterling is, eating up and then shitting out negative racial stereotypes, but cultural appropriation is still overt racism, and it is an infantilizing brand of racism.

seeing that instagram photo, esp the dog in the headdress, made me and probably others feel physically ill

christina fallin is, as i established earlier, a shitstain on the music industry, but wayne coyne’s participation in this racism is super-problematic because of his large standing within said industry.  to a lesser extent, the same could be said of sarah barthel’s tacit agreement with cultural appropriation in her presence in that instagram photo; phantogram is not a huge band but unlike chrome pony/pink pony whatever the fuck her “musical act” is called, phantogram does wield some small but growing influence as evidenced by their presence in advertisements, at least

also i keep forgetting to mention: christina fallin, if you’re out there, i know you tagged your racist photo with “appropriate culturation”—the word you’re looking for is “acculturation”; “culturation” is not a word.  i know you were trying to be fancy and shit but it didn’t work out well so maybe you should just drop off the face of the earth plz kthx.

creepbyradiohead:

Dont forget to yell “Fuck that chick from Phantogram” 
because she was also on the Wayne Coyne and Christina Fallin train of racism.

i love how pink pony/chrome pony/whatever the fuck their shitty band is called used the “but we had innocent intent!” argument

which is a really poor excuse for racism because “we intended well” does not minimize the hurt you caused people with your actions

but also because this most basic of bitches did not have good intentions as evidenced by the caption of “appropriate culturation”

this indicates that she fucking knew what she was doing, likely to create an uproar to gain publicity for her stupid band

not to mention that their band is from fucking oklahoma, a population with a huge population of native americans.  really, this is representative of the “but i have a [insert race here] friend” excuse for racism, but it’s even weaker because it’s “i live in a state that i guess has a lot of native americans?  so i’m allowed to do this because it’s ‘part of my culture’ as in my ancestors came in and raped, killed, and stole from these people and then shackled them to a system of oppression that is alive and well today.  so i’m entitled to this ‘beautiful’ headdress even though i clearly don’t know what it stands for and don’t care otherwise i wouldn’t fucking wear it!”

and wayne coyne jesus man

while i genuinely like the flaming lips as music-makers, i’ve kind of been looking for a reason not to like him for years because i have seldom encountered someone so into their own fucking self; he puts on this air of seeking a profound connection with other people but clearly he embodies a disturbing disconnect from everything around him

honestly though the satisfaction will come for those of us willing to call her out when everyone realizes that their band actually sucks because they are more image than substance

like all shitstains, christina fallin will soon fade out, leaving not a trace behind

vinceyface:

HAHAHA go Denny’s #ShotsFired #Dennys

vinceyface:

HAHAHA go Denny’s #ShotsFired #Dennys

(via elizabum)

Ok I see what you’re trying to get at here but this post is sloppy as fuck

Yeah, okay, sorry about that.  I was getting ready for work as I wrote this post and probably/definitely should’ve just saved it and waited but I was just so miffed; lemme try again.

I see/saw at the time that it’s super-uneven too and that I should’ve really put more into the why-trans-ethnic-is-invalid-as-an-identity and why-trans-ethnicity-is-appropriative-of-more-than-one-group.

And what I meant by “I don’t think that trans-ethnicity is even comparable to transgender-ness” is that I (and most people should) see transgender identities as valid and trans-ethnic identities as invalid and appropriative not only of whatever identity a trans-ethnic person is trying to claim, but also of transgender identities and especially of transgender terminology.  Trans-ethnicity is doubly problematic in that way.  That’s why I don’t see them as comparable, and I only say that and only attempt to distance the two because comparability is suggested by terminology.  I did an especially bad job of explaining all of that.

Furthermore, I’ll support the gender with which anyone identifies; I know that I and most people place at least some stock in gender and consequently in the gender binary.

On a different note, I didn’t consider at the time but now am “duh” ing that of course the mere scale of masculinity and femininity is not THE defining factor of the validity of transgender identities; in fact, many transgender folks identify outside of the binary and/or have a problem with the binary (for example Kate Bornstein who I even fucking referenced fuck).  I think that what I was trying to get at here is just that a gender binary exists and is strongly, even militantly enforced in this society.  And from there, despite white privilege, no racial binary exists—how could one?  And from there, because there is no scale on which to measure, for example, blackness (or really race in general) because there are so many examples of blackness and none of them fit on a scale, how can one identify as trans-ethnic without generalizing and stereotyping and therefore performing racism?  And how does someone who thinks they are performing race/ethnicity tell when they are delving into racial stereotypes?  I don’t believe that race can be performed, except in the form of white privilege.  All other aspects—the aspects in which trans-ethnic folks put the most stock—appear to be cultural/societal and then can be considered racism/cultural appropriation.

A word on cultural appropriation

genderbitch:

cassket:

decolonizeyourself:

digatisdi:

fyeahcap:

beautifulbiatch:

I’m a big supporter of cultural appropriation and I think the whole phenomenom gets far too much hatred on Tumblr. I personally appropriate a lot. It means that I don’t stick with the ways of my own culture but I explore (or have explored) other cultures for wisdom, aesthetics, values and ways of life. Yoga and meditation are examples of cultural appropriation that I take part in. They have not evolved in my own culture, they originate from Asia.

Borrowing ideas from other cultures is completely natural and I think it’s a very good thing. It encourages interaction between cultures and understanding of different cultures. It also helps people make their lives better. Think about anything, any one cultural thing that you’re attached to, be it science, pop music, Romeo and Juliet or whatever. If you think about it carefully, you realize that it has no one distinct origin. It’s a result of cultural appropriation. Take Romeo and Juliet for example. Shakespeare was British but the British did not invent the alphabet in which Romeo and Juliet is written. All culture that is complex at all is a result of borrowing and combining from other cultures.

I understand that it’s silly if someone borrows something from another culture and then parades around, saying “I’m so Native American now!!” or “I’m Japanese now!!!!1” That’s childish. Of course a whole culture can’t be packaged and defined like that by someone who hasn’t even lived in that culture. But a culture can be explored and borrowed from and this can be done honestly and respectfully, without childishly claiming that one “represents” the appropriated culture.

Of course, for children simple symbols are the most natural way to get to know new cultures. Children love playing Indian princesses, Spanish flamenco dancers and so on. For children a headdress can represent Native American culture and that’s ok. Little kids are not complex enough to understand subtler nuances of a strange culture, so let them play. As kids grow up, they should learn to relate to other cultures more maturely. That doesn’t have to mean making the choice of either leaving other cultures alone or becoming a part of them. It means understandind and respecting the fact that cultures are complex systems that no individual can ever fully grasp (not even one living in that culture). That doesn’t mean that people can’t appropriate, to explore strange cultures and take ideas from them. When one’s own cultural identity is well-aligned, one can have the capacity to absorb things from other cultures.

When I do yoga, I don’t go prancing around the Internet (or anywhere else, either) claiming to be “Asian” now that I do yoga. I’m fully aware that I’m European and that yoga is something that I have borrowed from another culture. I don’t intend to absorb the myths and beliefs that Indian yogis seem to embrace. I’m a Western person who does yoga. That’s completely different from an Indian yogi, yet there’s something that I share with the Indian yogi. There’s some wisdom that I have learned from another culture. I have made yoga work well with my Western way of life and it has a lot to give to me. I’m happier with yoga than I would be without. So, no matter how many Tumblr users condemn cultural appropriation, of course I’m not going to question my dear hobby which helps me be happy just because it’s appropriated from another culture. I’m just writing these things to explain to people why there’s nothing wrong with cultural appropriation.

As I previously wrote, I dislike the idea that cultures are commercialized and sold to people in neat packages that shrink the cultures into something that they were not in the first place and then lots of financial profit is made by so “abusing” another culture. That’s disgusting in my opinion. But that’s not the kind of appropriation that I’m talking about.

If you see a picture of a white person wearing a headdress, you don’t know why they’re wearing it, so you don’t have to be so angry about it. You don’t know how profoundly empowering the person in the picture may find the culture that they’re appropriating, and calling them racist because they’re white is just fucking stupid and closed-minded. Even if their relationship with the culture they’re appropriating is shallow at the moment, you don’t know where it’s growing. Maybe they’re just getting to know the strange culture, maybe they’re in the process of exploring it for deeper meanings behind all the aesthetics. I just don’t understand why you don’t let people do that. It makes me sad because some of those people may be actually sensitive to criticism.

It reminds me of a time in my youth when I was a vegetarian and I spoke for animal rights and I wore pants that were mass-producted because a) I didn’t know that much about the production of clothes and b) I had gotten the pants from my parents, so even if I had had something against them, I wouldn’t have had the heart to not wear them because I loved my parents. Anyway, once when I was talking about animal rights, a guy cynically remarked that my pants were mass-producted and had probably resulted in the death of a few creatures. I was quite young and felt hurt because of that remark. I’m not saying that it completely crushed my self-esteem or anything but I just love that young girl that I was back then so much that right now I feel like defending her and anyone who may be in a similar situation, receiving harsh and non-understanding critique from bitter individuals who think they’re “protecting” a culture when they’re in fact just being cruel and closed-minded.

You know there is a lot of fucking stupid and incorrect shit in this post but I just want to highlight this gem:

Take Romeo and Juliet for example. Shakespeare was British but the British did not invent the alphabet in which Romeo and Juliet is written. All culture that is complex at all is a result of borrowing and combining from other cultures.


What the fuck?

Though I think the part about their pants was my favourite.

What the fuck did I just read? Does the OP even know what “appropriation” means? I can’t. So many wrong with OP’s post.

Reblogged for context of my “what the fuck?” response. 

I really want to just punch the OP in the face until the stupid fuckery stops spilling out of their mouth. Fist twitching.

OP is possibly one of the most narrow-minded people I’ve ever heard of regarding cultural appropriation despite how “open-minded” she would love to think she is.  I would do a critical analysis but I don’t even have the energy to go through every word of this long-ass whiny tirade.  Pretty much same reaction as Kinsey and digatisdi lul.

(via punwitch)

sooolondon:

puzzlegirlsandpoprocks:

OMG! PC LOL is the WORST KINDA BLOG EVER!

What the fuck is this shit anyway! Oh wait! I KNOW! FULL BLOWN FUCKING RACISM!

But anti-whitewashing blogs are terrible?! Fuck your thoughts! Fuck your words. Come back at us when shit like this stop existing. 

someone come and get their people 

because being pissed about cultural appropriation is totally just disguised jealousy…

it has nothing to do with racism…

and the way to combat people who call out racists is to be racist…

riiiight…

/sarcasm

(Source: captaindoubled, via sugahwaatah)

I fucking love Those Darlins and Beach House but

what is up with Jessi Darlin wearing a head-dress?

what is up with this “land of savages” shit in holy dances?

my two favorite bands, tainted by cultural appropriation and imperialist racism.  not cool.

fact: Feathers as fashion adornments in the 19th-century threatened many bird species with extinction. Feathers are once again a vogue accessory… know your history, know what you may be supporting.

adailyriot:

fact also: we natives often have our feathers regulated because of things like the fact that we use eagle feathers. However, we do not use them carelessly as they are sacred to us.

please think of your fashion choices… this is yet another reason why not to appropriate other cultures. Doing so on a mass scale and in a way that is not cohesive with the cultures these things/items are being taken from puts more than just that culture at risk, it can also put other animal’s lives in danger as well. 

(via rematiration-deactivated2013111)